Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Paradise Taveuni Fiji 2018

Tuesday, 31 July 2018

Fiji s 2018 Dive Fiesta Tourism Fiji

Tourism Fiji wants to revitalise the dive tourism industry to Fiji

I was lucky to be invited to sample seven resorts in a wonderful whirlwind tour of diving
and resort living in March 2018.

OUR group of eleven from NZ, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Germany met in Nadi and headed off to the massive Captain Cook Cruise boat early on day one. We heard about their 4, 7 and 11 day cruises. The eleven day one goes East to the Lau Group and looks like a grand adventure.

Captain Cook Cruises do one to two dives a day and lots of cruising including two mammoth cruises for eleven nights to the Lau Group of Islands in the far East and the Northern islands.

Our first dive was “Golden Dreams” at Voli Voli with Ra Divers on the North side of Fiji. We were promised five ghost pipefish and were lucky to find eight including one of the rare hairy robust ghost
pipefish. I had left my macro lenses at home and only took the wide angle set up.


The overcast conditions meant that there was limited light and so I tried to do close up wide angle photography.

Voli Voli is owned by the Darling family from Christchurch. They have rebuilt the resort to an even higher standard after Cyclone Winston and are also adding more luxury family units and accommodation for groups of six. There are beautiful gardens on each Vale. Nick, the manager says that it can accommodate a family or six friends in total privacy and luxury. They are still celebrating the Excellence in Tourism award for quality accommodation. That evening, we had drinks and some very fine dining at their new restaurant.

In the morning we set off for the famous Mellow Yellow dive site.  This site has stunning coral gardens and coral windows. The next dive was Chile. I found a coral Window of Dreams and took a few photos of Nick.

For keen underwater photographers, Chile is a dive to capture those stunning model photos. It has so much colour and fish life. It is a vivid reminder of the incredible underwater panoramas that Fiji has
been famous for. Of course, anyone who has dived at the Bligh Waters will know just how beautiful and photogenic these reefs are.

On day two we took the bus to Wananavu Resort a few kilometres away. This is a beautiful garden resort in the protection of a bay. Without taking a breath, we headed off for a dive even before the
resort orientation.

Friday, 20 July 2018

Fiji Scuba Diving Adventures



Fiji Scuba Diving - Taveuni Adventures!!! Just a short clip from this awesome trip to Fiji to meet dive centres around Taveuni and Savusavu. Thanks for all the hospitality, 3 more days in Savusavu meeting members and running a member forum then off to Pacific Harbour for the day... I will have to wait to get home to edit a full length Vlog of this epic adventure but in the mean time, enjoy the short clips and let me know if you like them :-)

Massive thanks to Garden Island Resort and their team for having me out on the boat to do the Rainbow Reef while I was there :-)

#PADI #WeArePADI #RainbowReef #Fiji #Scuba #Diving

Wednesday, 4 July 2018

Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tag Photo Competition 2019

Once again, Namena Marine Reserve would like to invite you to participate in their annual Dive Tag Photo Competition! The winner of the competition will have unique privilege of having their photo featured on the 2019 Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tags.

The deadline to submit photos is 15th August 2018



The winner of the competition will have unique privilege of having their photo featured on the 2019 Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tags.

Individuals from around the world are invited to submit up to five underwater photos from the
Namena Marine Reserve in Fiji, containing a solitary animal or fish (see below for examples of past Dive Tags). Clear credit will be given to the photographer.

As you may know, people travel from around the globe, at great expense, to dive in the Namena Marine Reserve with exclusive dive operators. When they leave, they keep their dive tag as a treasured token from their time in Fiji. Not only is this competition a great opportunity to highlight your art to an international audience, your participation means a lot to the native people of Kubulau, who take great pride in Namena and have made a long-term investment in the protection of their resources. 

The dive tag program has been very successful over the past 14 years and continues to show people from around the world that Namena is a special site.

We acknowledge and appreciate your commitment to the Namena Marine Reserve and hope that you will participate by submitting your photo(s) for consideration. The deadline to submit photos is August 15, 2018. Please email up to five original photos along with a signed photography license agreement (see below) to Peni Were at namenamarinereserve@gmail.com

If your photo is chosen, we will contact you to request a high-resolution version to be submitted by September 15, 2018. The winner will receive a free dive tag featuring their winning photo. 

Thank you in advance for your interest and participation. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to seeing your spectacular photos.

Vinaka vakalevu,

Peni Were


Peni Were

Mobile: Vodafone: (679) 925-4564, Digicel: (679) 728-8855/7912257



Saturday, 30 June 2018

Fiji Scuba Diving - Taveuni Adventures



Fiji Scuba Diving - Taveuni Adventures!!! Just a short clip from this awesome trip to Fiji to meet dive centres around Taveuni and Savusavu.


Thanks for all the hospitality, 3 more days in Savusavu meeting members and running a member forum then off to Pacific Harbour for the day...


I will have to wait to get home to edit a full length Vlog of this epic adventure but in the mean time, enjoy the short clips and let me know if you like them :-)

Massive thanks to Garden Island Resort and their team for having me out on the boat to do the Rainbow Reef while I was there :-)

#PADI #WeArePADI #RainbowReef #Fiji #Scuba #Diving

Friday, 1 June 2018

Monday, 28 May 2018

Episode #15 - Fiji Scuba Diving Adventures



Episode #15 - Fiji Scuba Diving Adventures!!! This May I adventured around Taveuni and Savusavu for work, meeting as many of the dive shop owners/managers/instructors that I could. We had 3 successful member forums and I managed to get 2 days of diving in. 1 at the Rainbow Reef and 1 at the local reefs of Savusavu. It was an amazing journey and thanks to all the shops for meeting with me and especially the ones who took me out diving :-)

Friday, 27 April 2018

Diving In The Land Of ‘BULA’: The South Pacific’s Fiji Islands

As the plane begins the descent into Nadi (Nan-dee), Fiji, passengers eagerly press their faces closer to the windows. Glistening below is the multicolored turquoise water of the Pacific, a scene that is beautiful to behold from an aerial view, but for divers holds a special allure. Upon arriving, guests are met with a chorus of “bula, bula” (Fijian for hello) from a crowd of friendly, smiling Fijian faces. For many of these travelers, this will be the trip of a lifetime when they experience the gracious people, the romantic palm-studded beaches, and especially the world-class diving.

Volcanic Origins

Fiji, northeast of Australia and southwest of Hawaii, is made up of 330 islands, of which only about 100 are inhabited. The largest of the islands are Viti Levu (vee-tee lay-vu), which is home to the capital city of Suva, and to the north, Vanua Levu Island (van-ou-a lay-vu). Eighty percent of the population lives on these two islands, which make up 87 percent of Fiji’s landmass. The highest point is Tomanivi (toh-man-e-vee) at 4,369 feet (1,324 m), the tip of a long-extinct volcano. All the islands are the remains of volcanic activity. Most of the largest lagoons, such as Beqa (bang-guh) lagoon in the southern islands, are the remains of volcanoes that have long since collapsed.
Since there was no written language before the Europeans arrived, the early history of Fiji is sketchy. It is accepted that the first inhabitants were the Lapita, who came to the islands around 1500 B.C.; they were named for an area in New Caledonia from where it is believed they originated. The islands were visited and partially inhabited by the Tongans and Samoans, who left behind many of their traditions that are still practiced today.
The Fijians are some of the warmest and most gracious people in the world, but it has not always been that way. At one time, they were cannibals. One historical account states that when Captain Bligh was thrown off the Bounty, he made his way between Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, but he chose not to land because of the reputation of the fierce warriors who inhabited the islands. The practice of cannibalism began to change in the 1830s when Christian missionaries arrived, and by 1874 Fiji became a British crown colony. In 1970 Fiji gained independence from British rule.
Elections in 1987 created a coalition of mainly Indian descendants, and this arrangement was a major source of unrest for the native Fijians. In the early 1990s, a coup headed by a Fijian military officer of Melanesian descent set the stage for free elections held in 1992. Fiji now has one of the only governments in the world primarily run by its endemic people in which the “Greater Council of High Chiefs” remains very influential in the politics of the country.
The Fijian economy is one of the most developed economies throughout the islands of the South Pacific. About one-third of all national industry consists of sugar cane processing. It is not unusual to see high stacks of sugar cane being transported to the processing plants on small-rail trains. Other exports include gold, clothing, timber and processed fish, and one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy involves the growing popularity of tourism.

Fijian Traditions

Perhaps one of the most time-honored traditions is the kava ceremony. Kava comes from the roots of a plant in the pepper family. Dried roots are pounded into a powdered form and mixed with water.
Participants in the kava ceremony sit in a circle on the floor with their Fijian hosts. A small bowl is filled with kava from the larger ceremonial bowl and is then passed to the first guest by the cup bearer. The bowl is refilled for each participant when it is his or her turn to drink. There is an established ritual around the kava ceremony that includes clapping of the hands three times after emptying the bowl and making a “yucky face” to indicate how yummy the concoction tastes. Even though it looks like muddy water and has a bitter taste, kava is said to have a calming effect.
Travelers can also share in the tradition of storytelling. To preserve their heritage, each generation passes their history to the next generation through the art of storytelling, known as the Talanoa (tal-uh-no-uh), and the stories were often shared during the traditional kava ceremony. Another popular form of storytelling is known as Meke (meck-ee), which includes dances created by the Fijian natives that were also used to carry their history down through the ages. The Meke, frequently used to entertain visitors to the islands, is performed in native costumes and provides a most enjoyable show.

Fiji - photo by Ruth & Barry Guimbellot