Thursday, 31 October 2019

Sea Snake eating Moray Eel, Fiji (Laticauda colubrina vs. Gymnothorax sp.)

The banded snake krait (Laticauda colubrina) videotaped feeding on an eel (Gymnothorax sp.) in Fiji. Location was a patch reef off Pacific Harbour at a depth of about 30'. The krait had already killed the eel and was swallowing it when my wife, Marj Awai, found it.

Bruce Carlson video.

[taxonomy:binomial=Laticauda colubrina]
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Tuesday, 20 August 2019

Dolphins at Lawaki Beach House Beqa Fiji - April 2019

Wednesday, 14 August 2019

Namena Marine Reserve photo competition for 2020 tags closes tomorrow

Individuals from around the world are invited to enter an underwater photo from the Namena Marine Reserve, in Fiji that contains a solitary animal or fish (see examples attached). You may submit up to five original photos along with a signed photography license agreement (see attached). All entries submitted on or before August 15, 2019 will have a chance to be featured on the 2020 Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tag with clear credit given to the photographer.

People come from around the globe, at great expense, to dive in the Namena Marine Reserve with exclusive dive operators. Our photo contest is a great opportunity to highlight your art to an international audience on a memorable token from their travels to Fiji. The dive tag program has been very successful over the past ten years and continues to show people from around the world that Namena is a special site where the native people of Kubulau have invested and take pride in the long-term protection of their resources. 

We acknowledge and appreciate your commitment to the Namena Marine Reserve and kindly request that you submit a photo for consideration. To submit a photo for the contest, please email your submissions to Peni Were at namenamarinereserve@gmail.com any time before August 15, 2019. If your photo is chosen, we will contact you to request a high-resolution version to be submitted by September 15, 2019. The winner will receive a dive tag featuring their winning photo.

Thank you in advance for your interest and participation. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to seeing your spectacular photos. 

Vinaka vakalevu

Peni Were


Tuesday, 13 August 2019

FIJI Dive Fiesta 2019 dates announced

FIJI Dive Fiesta 2019 dates announced

8th - 15th May 2020

Monday, 5 August 2019

FIJI Nominated for DIVE Travel Awards 2019


FIJI has been shortlisted in the DIVE Travel Awards 2019 for top diving destination in the world. Click here to preview the Top 25 in each category.

The DIVE Travel Awards are Industry awards voted for by DIVE Magazine readers. The 2019 DIVE Travel Awards has seen 78 destinations, 470 dive centres or resorts, and 215 liveaboards nominated for the awards. The Top 25 in each category are now through to the final vote, which will remain open until 31 October and the overall winners will be announced at this year's  DEMA show on 14th November 2019 in Orlando, Florida

We would like to encourage all our Dive Members to click this link for the voting page:

The 2019 DIVE Travel Awards has seen 78 destinations, 470 dive centres or resorts, and 215 liveaboards nominated for the awards. The Top 25 in each category are now through to the final vote, which will remain open until 31 October. The overall winners will be announced at this year's DEMA show, held between 13 - 16 November in Orlando, Florida

As an added bonus, we have 50 free subscriptions to the digital issue of DIVE Magazine to give away for voting in the 2019 DIVE Travel Awards (terms and conditions apply). We've also changed the format this year to prevent spammers from meddling in our election - it's still pretty straightforward to enter but just in case you have any questions:

How to enter:
  1. Go to the box below and enter a valid e-mail address.
  2. If you are using a shared computer and someone has already voted, you may need to click the 'logout' button underneath the picture in the voting module  -  gleam logout button.
  3. Select your favourites from each category (you can vote for all 25 or just one if you wish) and press 'continue' to cast your vote. Select the next category and again pick your favourites.
  4. If you are using a shared computer or iPad remember to 'logout' at the end so the next person can vote.
The winners of the free digital subscriptions will be selected randomly from all those who voted after the voting is closed.

Monday, 17 June 2019

2020 Namena Annual Dive Tag Photo Contest

Bula vinaka once again,

It’s time for our annual Dive Tag Photo Contest, and we would like to invite you to participate for a chance to have your photograph featured on the 2020 Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tag!

Individuals from around the world are invited to enter an underwater photo from the Namena Marine Reserve, in Fiji that contains a solitary animal or fish (see examples attached). 

You may submit up to five original photos along with a signed photography license agreement (see attached). 

All entries submitted on or before August 15, 2019 will have a chance to be featured on the 2020 Namena Marine Reserve Dive Tag with clear credit given to the photographer.

People come from around the globe, at great expense, to dive in the Namena Marine Reserve with exclusive dive operators. Our photo contest is a great opportunity to highlight your art to an international audience on a memorable token from their travels to Fiji. 

The dive tag program has been very successful over the past ten years and continues to show people from around the world that Namena is a special site where the native people of Kubulau have invested and take pride in the long-term protection of their resources. 

We acknowledge and appreciate your commitment to the Namena Marine Reserve and kindly request that you submit a photo for consideration. To submit a photo for the contest, please email your submissions to Peni Were at namenamarinereserve@gmail.comany time before August 15, 2019. 

If your photo is chosen, we will contact you to request a high-resolution version to be submitted by September 15, 2019. The winner will receive a dive tag featuring their winning photo.

Thank you in advance for your interest and participation. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to seeing your spectacular photos. 

Vinaka vakalevu

Peni Were



Saturday, 20 April 2019

New Zealand Mag Dive Pacific - Taveuni Rainbow reef

Our latest edition of Dive Pacific features Fiji's silky sharks phenomenon, an interview with Jean-Michel Cousteau, a visit to the Rainbow Reef, and where to find the good spots for spearfishing. Plus lots of dive news from all over.

Thursday, 11 April 2019

Reef Conditions, Somosomo Straits, Taveuni from 2002 onwards – Fiji Coral Reef Monitoring Network (FCRMN)


Background


Reef Surveys have been carried out at two sites (the Great White Wall on the outer face, and the back of Blue Ribbon Eel Reef / Jerry’s Jelly on the inside of the Rainbow Reef) in the Somosomo Straits since 2002, with the exception of 2005 (Rainbow Reef only), 2008 (no surveys), and 2015 – 2017 (no surveys due to poor weather and time constraints).


Figure 1: Map of survey sites on the Rainbow Reef
In 2000 and 2002 Fiji reefs suffered extensive hard coral death from coral bleaching due to exceptionally high water temperatures.
However, coral cover recovered to pre-bleaching levels by 2005, much faster than originally predicted. In the Somosomo Straits, cyclones had some impact around 2006 and 2007, but once more the corals recovered very quickly.
High water temperatures threatened coral health in shallow waters in parts of Fiji in 2014 – 2016, but the Rainbow Reef was unaffected.
A Crown of Thorns Starfish (COTS) outbreak in 2014 caused widespread coral death but stopped after Cyclone Winston in February 2016.
The cyclone caused extensive coral breakage on exposed sites, while others were relatively unscathed, and large numbers of new coral colonies were seen on damaged sites in 2018.

Full report:


Wednesday, 3 April 2019

Strengthening Fiji's laws to protect sharks and other important species

Sharks that are alive and healthy in Fiji's oceans are worth a great deal of money to Fiji's economy. In 2012, the Pew Foundation calculated that shark diving alone generated US$42.2 million for Fiji's economy
Unfortunately, the unnecessary killing of sharks, whether intentional or as a result of an accidental bycatch, removes this opportunity and has adverse effects on marine ecosystems and Fiji’s tourism industry. It is vital, therefore, to provide protection for shark nurseries, and ensure Fiji has effective fisheries laws and initiatives for shark protection that are implemented.
Early this year, dead baby sharks hit the headlines when around 10 juvenile hammerhead sharks were found dumped in a culvert near Suva. These endangered animals may have been caught illegally in nets set across a nearby river mouth where scientists at the Marine School, USP have undertaken a detailed and celebrated study and found a significant and important breeding ground.
Fortunately, the newly created Inshore Fisheries Management Division (IFMD) within the Ministry of Fisheries is currently looking to strengthen a variety of fisheries laws and regulations and their implementation including, but not limited to, the laws that protect sharks. In this bulletin, we consider the existing relevant laws on netting around rivers and discuss additional measures to ensure that sharks are better protected. We also briefly consider other initiatives that are currently being led by the IFMD to make Fiji's inshore fisheries more sustainable for the benefit of all Fijians. For more information regarding other shark conservation measures in Fiji, please see our previous bulletin: “A Legal Policy Discussion of Shark Conservation in Fiji”.
Damian the hero
A scientific study conducted by leading marine scientists Amandine Marie, Celso Cawich, Tom Vierus, Susanna Piovano and Ciro Rico of USP and Cara Miller presented empirical evidence for the existence of a Scalloped Hammerhead Shark (SHS, Sphyrna lewini) nursery in the Rewa Delta in Fiji.
This study focused on developing a more detailed understanding of the reproductive biology and critical habitat of the SHS in the Rewa Delta.
Amongst other things, the research suggested that good information regarding shark species’ biology, ecology and habitat use is essential for developing sustainable management plans. Such information includes:
  • coastal sharks species being known to aggregate at discrete sites
  • the tendency of some sharks to return to their birthplace to breed (including the scalloped hammerhead, Sphyrna lewini) making nursing areas critical habitats
  • the expectation that newborn sharks of coastal shark species use more sheltered areas to reduce their vulnerability to predation and compensate for their limited foraging skills.
Taking those factors into consideration, the researchers recommended the following in order of importance:
  • Complete ban of gillnet fishing in the Rewa Delta throughout the year
  • Partial ban of gillnet fishing in the Rewa Delta from sunset to sunrise throughout the year
  • Partial ban of gillnet fishing in the Rewa Delta from sunset to sunrise during the parturition period (October-April)
  • Partial ban of gillnet fishing in the Rewa Delta from sunset to sunrise during the peak of the parturition period (December-March).

James Sloan and Emily Samuela


Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Send us your best pictures for 2020 NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Calendar “Amazing Fiji Wildlife and Wild Places” Submission Deadline 7 April, 2019


The 2019 NatureFiji-MareqetiViti calendar was a great success, thanks to the contribution of stunning photographs from members and the public.

We are now calling for pictures for the production of 2020 calendars.

Send your photographs to Nunia Thomas at support@naturefiji.org

The image must be your own work and preferably low resolution for the selection, but you must be able to provide high resolution (above 1.5MB) if selected.

Please include your name and contact details (including postal address). Each photograph must have a caption story including the location.

All proceeds will directly support our conservation work in Fiji.

Photographers whose photos are selected will be acknowledged in the calendar and receive a free copy of the calendar. Thank you for supporting Fiji's wildlife conservation.

Tuesday, 19 March 2019

Another great guitarfish pic in Fiji - Rhynchobatus australiae

We know R australis is here from genetic testing, and we have several photos of guitarfish from the Coral Coast (see the Great Fiji Shark count poster)...

Rhynchobatus australiae